12 May 2015

#52Ancestors - Week 20 - Black Sheep

Week 20 (May 14-20) – Black Sheep: Each of us has an ancestor who was the troublemaker or the ne’er-do-well. This is their week.

For this week's blog my focus is on Isaac Ramsey, my 2nd cousin twice removed - great nephew of my great great grandmother Ellen Steward (AKA Mary Ann Ellen Garrett) who I wrote about in week 18.

Isaac was born about 1876, then son of John Ramsay and Mary Ellen Carr.

He enlisted with the 2nd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers on Dec 27 1897 - this seemed like a good thing, but as his military career shows, he really was a bit of a black sheep.




His record reads like this:
16 March 1899 - Awaiting Trial
25 March 1899 - Tried and convicted of "using insubordinate language to his superior officer" and sentenced to be imprisoned with hard labour for 28 days.

He returned to duty on 22 April 1899 and then was posted to the 4th Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers on 12 February 1900

On 1 July 1900 he deserted rejoining more than 2 months later on 19 September 1900 when he again waited trial.

25 Septempber 1900 - Tried and convicted by DCM
1/ Desertion
2/ Losing by neglect his equipment, clothing & Regimental ??.

Sentenced to 56 days I. D. L and stoppages 5/-
To Prison

All his former service was forfeited on his conviction for desertion meaning that his "limited service" time started again.


He once again returned to duty on 20 November 1900 but just over a month later....

7 January 1901 - Awarded 8 days I. D. L. by C.O. for absence and forfeit of 9 days pay
18 January 1901 - In confines(?) awaiting trial
31 January 1901 - Tried and convicted by D.C.M.
1/ Breaking out of Barracks
2/ Disobeying a lawful command given by his superior officer
3/ An act to the prejudice of good order and military discipline.

Sentenced to be imprisoned with Hard Labour for one year!

He served his sentence at York Castle Military Prison - one of 92 prisoners enumerated there during the 1901 census




He returned to duty on 31 January 1901



On 30 March 1901 he was discharged
"in consequence of his being incorrigible and worthless"


2 comments:

  1. Love it! "Incorrigible and worthless", so descriptive. Do you know if he ever turned himself around and did something worthwhile?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Love it! "Incorrigible and worthless", so descriptive. Do you know if he ever turned himself around and did something worthwhile?

    ReplyDelete